Emergency Management

Chatham Islands CDEM Group PlanCivil Defence and Emergency Management

The Chatham Island Council (Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Group) requests your submission on the Chatham Islands CDEM Group Plan.

This request for submissions is being circulated in accordance section 52 (1) of the CDEM Act.  This consultation is formal and public, and part of the public consultation process required by the Act.

The purpose of this consultation is to assist the Council in further refining the content to best meet the requirements of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 and the Chatham Islands community.  Your submission will be processed and considered by the Council (CDEM Group).

The deadline for submissions is the close of business Monday the 7th of May 2018.

 

Download submission-form

 

Please return submissions to:

CDEM Group

c/- Rana Solomon Emergency Manager

Chatham Islands Council

PO Box 24 Waitangi

CHATHAM ISLANDS 8942

Email: rana@cic.govt.nz

In an emergency, always dial:

Fire (03)305 0111

Police (03)305 0334

Hospital (03)305 0035

Emergency Management (03)305 0033

 

The Chatham Islands Council provides an efficient and effective system of emergency management that minimises the potential effect of all hazards in the community and the environment.

Civil Defence

The Council carries out hazard-based risk management in four areas: reduction of risk, readiness for events, response and recovery after an event, under the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002.

Being prepared

Tsunami evacuation zones

View the interactive Chatham Islands tsunami evacuation zones web map.

View tsunami evacuation zones pdf’s for:

What do the tsunami evacuation zones mean?

The zones are the areas you may need to evacuate, or stay out of, if you feel a long or strong earthquake, or if there is an official tsunami warning.

You should move out of all the evacuation zones – red, orange and yellow – if you:

  • feel a weak or moderate, rolling earthquake that goes for longer than a minute
  • feel an earthquake so strong that it is hard to stand up, and furniture starts moving around
  • see a sudden rise or fall in sea level
  • hear loud and unusual noises from the sea

Red Zone:  The red zone includes beaches, estuaries, harbours and river mouths.  You should leave this area as a precaution if you feel a long or strong earthquake, or if you are told to in any official tsunami warning (a ‘Beach and Marine warning’ or a ‘Land and Marine warning’).  Most tsunamis aren’t big enough to flood land, but even small tsunamis can cause strong and unpredictable currents and surges in the water that you don’t want to get caught in, which is why we tell people to stay out of the red zone even in a small tsunami.  You can expect to evacuate the red zone several times in your lifetime.

Orange Zone:  The orange zone is the area that could be inundated in a tsunami big enough to flood land (a tsunami bigger than 1 meter wave height at coast above normal sea level at the time).  You should leave this area as a precaution if you feel a long or strong earthquake, or if you are told to in an official warning (a ‘Land and Marine warning’).  You can expect to evacuate this zone a few times (maybe 2 or 3 times) in a lifetime.

Yellow Zone:  The yellow zone is the area that could be inundated in a very big tsunami (a tsunami bigger than 8 metres wave height at coast above normal sea level at the time).  You should leave this area as a precaution if you feel a long or strong earthquake, or if you are told to in an official warning (a ‘Land and Marine warning’).  While it is possible you will have to evacuate this zone sometime in your lifetime, it is unlikely.

We have taken a cautious approach when drawing these zones. As our understanding of the Chatham Island’s tsunami hazard improves these zones may become smaller.

How will I know a tsunami is coming?

We don’t rely on just one way to tell people if there is a tsunami warning in place – there are several ways that you may get a warning.

If you feel a long, rolling earthquake or feel an earthquake so strong that it is hard to stand up and furniture is starting to move around, you should leave the red, orange and yellow zones as soon as the shaking stops.  Do not wait for an official warning.

If there is time for Civil Defence to issue an official warning (if the tsunami is coming from more than about an hour away), you may get a warning the following ways:

  • Telephone, through your local coordinator
  • Word of mouth
  • Radio
  • Television
  • Internet, e.g. Facebook
  • Sirens
  • From friends and relatives in New Zealand or overseas

You can do your bit by sharing official warnings with family, friends and neighbours.  Every effort will be made to advise people on the Chatham Islands of a tsunami warning, through many different channels, but because of the nature of our Islands and the isolated population residents must recognise that in some instances they may not receive a warning.

Local coordinators are:

South Coast
Eileen Cameron 3050310

Waitangi
Eddie Fraser 3050106

Te One
N/A

Big Bush
Albert Tuuta 3050088

Port Hutt
Brian Solomon 9757540

Wharekauri / Waitangi West
Gill Dix 3050024

Kaingaroa
Dale Whaitiri 3050251
Mark Taylor 3050089

Owenga
Nigel Ryan 3050264
Jay Preece 3050449

Pitt Island
Nadine Lanauze 3050172
Brent Mallinson 3050212

Emergency Contact Details pdf 494 kB

 

Marine Oil Spill Response

The Chatham Islands Council prepares, maintains and reviews Regional Marine Oil Spill Contingency Plans, under the Maritime Transport Act 1994.

Plans and reports

View the Emergency Management plans and reports »